Kierkegaard in Copenhagen

Above all, do not lose your desire to walk. Every day I walk myself into a state of well-being and walk away from every illness. I have walked myself into my best thoughts, and I know of no thought so burdensome that one cannot walk away from it. (via Goodreads)

Naar man saaledes bliver ved at gaae, saa gaaer det nok (via Kierkegaard)

Kierkegaard is Denmark’s ultimate flâneur and walking icon; he may be an arch Copenhagener but it’s impossible to imagine him on a bicycle. In The old ways Robert Macfarlane muses that Kierkegaard “speculated that the mind might function optimally at the pedestrian pace of three miles [sic] per hour and…going out for a wander and finding himself ‘so overwhelmed with ideas’ that he ‘could scarcely walk’.”

In Wanderlust Rebecca Solnit describes Kierkegaard’s walking as (p24):

a way to bask in the faint human warmth of brief encounters, acquaintances’ greetings, and overheard conversations. A lone walker is both present and detached from the world around, more than an audience but less than a participant. Walking assuages or legitimizes this alientation: one is mildly disconnected because one is walking, not because one is incapable of connecting.

MORE pp23-26. See journals, esp Steps on life’s way.

Ace quote p200: Kierkegaard, were he less prolific and less Danish, might be the best candidate for a real life flaneur.

Golden Days marked the bicentenary of his birth with Den originale Kierkegaard exhibition at Den Sorte Diamant and the Museum of Copenhagen’s Kierkegaard og kærlighed exhibition, plus a selection of guided walks, ranging from one aimed at children aged 8-12, one exploring his relationship to love (to the family, to den eneste ene, to friends and others close to you) seen through places where he lived, and, most notably, Jagten på det almindelige menneske (In search of the ordinary man/common person) in Avedøre Stationsby and Brøndby Strand, led by Forstadsmuseets musuemsinspektør Lisbeth Hollensen and/or Trine Maria Olsen and historian Serdal Guzel (umlaut), bringing participants closer to life in the suburbs by challenging ideas and prejudices about everyday life there; combining Kierkegaard’s concept of the spidsborger with city planners’ big ideas of the good life, giving an insight into who lives in the suburbs and how life there plays out in comparison the the planners’ original ideas.

Both History Tours and Byvandring.nu (inc the year 1845 and disagreement with Corsaren) offer Kierkegaard themed walks.

Kierkegaard and Copenhagen

Visit Copenhagen’s Kierkegaard page has a map with some key locations. Discovered from this that the Design Museum formerly housed the hospital where Kierkegaard died.

He’s a rather different figure in Denmark. The Kierkegaard reearch centre is based in the Faculty of Religion, while Søren as doomed lover is the popular image locally. Unlike HCA he’s pretty invisible in the cityscape. See Kierkegaard coach Pia Søltoft, author of Kierkegaard og kærlighedens skikkelser and philosophy rethinker Mads Vestergaard, while others cite his gloomy Dane credentials, a cautionary tale on individuality.

Updates: Kierkegaard gårpavement quotes; tastefully embedded in the pavement on Søren Kierkegaards Plads|Søren Kierkegaard in CPH |CPH Post |In the tidy city of the world’s most anxious manI Kierkegaards fodsporbest map | Hvidovre link | statue | 12km Kierkegaard by Nature route in Gilleleje (via pic), taking in 11 quotes for philosophical reflection | a Kierkegaard cookbook | Litterært kort on K and KBH (PDF) | Space, self and literary style in RS Thomas’s readings of Søren Kierkegaard | DONE: A/drift, tumblr & glossary

More: Fear and trembling in CPH: in search of Søren Kierkegaard (R3) & Coursera’s Kierkegaard MOOC; Eksistensfilosofisk Akademi

Kierkegaard plaque

understated plaque on the site of Kierkegaard’s Nytorv home

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