Høstfest! Harvest time in Denmark

foto

on guard

Time for some more foraging, aka going into your garden and picking stuff. We’re over-run with apples, although the beags do their best, endlessly playing in the evening sun with windfalls, and there are herbs to freeze or dry – rosemary and thyme are supposedly perennial, but not in our garden they ain’t. The rhubarb has survived being moved twice this summer, hopefully we’ve finally found its sweet spot, the gooseberries were as disappointing as usual and the raspberries should have been pruned earlier. Our grønkål/kale is coming along OK, despite the best efforts of slugs and snails. Can you tell I’m not much of a gardener? Partner is lined up to divide and conquer our løvstikke/lovage and kvan/angelica, so they can come into their own next year, and in the case of the latter, hopefully flower in a dramatic fashion.

Other things we can avail ourselves of:

  • damsons/kræge – or probably not, although maybe could substitute mirabeller, more prevalent here – Delia’s chutney | Telegraph
  • hasselnødder/hazelnuts – preferably cobnuts, sighted last year on Roskilde Torv
  • havtorn/sea buckthorn – good with apples in compote; chutney, infused as a tea
  • hyldebær/elderberries – soup with potato starch? ellers tak
  • kvæde/quince – after the first frosts
  • rosehips/hyben – infused as a tea; chutney
  • røn/rowan – aka mountain ash; apparently it is a tradition in both Scotland and Denmark to have a rowan tree by the front door to ward off witches and evil spirits, and we have one handily placed; jelly seems to be a thing, also wine; TBH thought the berries were poisonous
  • sandtorn/tjørn/hawthorn – jam?
  • slåen/sloes – Daily Mail | BBC | Gdn gin

A Facebook friend, who is doing the full Hugh FW, has been mushrooming and after several attempts located some kantereller/chanterelles, but I think we’ll have to stick to Irma for those. Theirs come from Belarus, how exciting is that.

But what to do with all this stuff? The answer tends to be jam, involving massive amounts of sugar, or snaps. Planning to use some rowan berries in the last of our Faroese snaps, plus some sloe gin, which I have mixed memories of as a student.

Latest entry from backlash corner: from Jay Rayner’s Just because you can go foraging doesn’t mean you should:

5,000 years of agriculture and now we’re all foraging. I bet the Mesopotamians wonder why they bothered…the biggest argument against it is the lacklustre and uninspiring food that so often results from all that clomping about down in the woods.

As someone yet to empty their one jar of kryddesalt I can only agree, but the Danes seem well up for it, in particular as part of an event.

Last week a Høst-havemarked (harvest and garden festival; coverage) in nextdoor suburb Rødovre closed Vestegnens Kulturuge (also part of Golden Days). The garden of the Heerup Museum, which incidentally offers the least value for money of any museum I’ve ever been to, was transformed with mini-gardens, an apple press was on duty, honey from some local urban bees was on sale, you could roast your own coffee, grind your own flour, drink local wine…the gullaschkanon (field kitchen) got an outing, there was a WW1 exhibition including a row of tents, 200 flea market stalls and local radio supplying the sounds. Festivities continued with music from established names and local acts until midnight, moving to Damhuskroen until 5 in the morning. Blimey. Just a shame about the weather.

Sunday was Naturens Dag, with Byhøst doing an autumn forage in Valbyparken. Also involved was haymaking with scythes from Vild Med Vilje – read their report from the Vild Festival in August, when it also rained, and lots of stuff for children. Elsewhere there was some sort of fishing cum picnic thing at Sct Jørgens Sø, which is nice, as I’ve been pondering for a while why more doesn’t go on at the Lakes. Next Sunday sees a picnic at Tippen, with grapepicking at our local vinyard pencilled in for 11-12 October.

Meanwhile, the Eat your city conference (Facebook) promoted urban farming, particularly as a social movement, looking very serious minded, but it did culminate in KBHs Høstfest (Facebook | review), a harvest festival with a 2500 seater 800m longboard down Sønder Boulevard – it was hipster heaven. All part of the Sharing Copenhagen effort.

For a more realistic view of the eating habits of the average Dane see Michael Booth in The Local, or visit any ‘budget’ supermarket.

Advertisements

Simon Armitage walks home

photo credit: Guardian

In 2010 Simon Armitage took a walk down the Pennine Way and wrote a book about it, Walking home. Like his earlier book, All points north (1999), it’s laugh out loud funny in a very British way – self deprecation to the max.

Reviews: Amazon (with both sides of the argument) | Goodreads | Google Books (long excerpt) | Guardian 1 & 2 (extract) | LibraryThing

The walk is described as a ‘troubadour journey’ – Simon walked without a penny in his pocket, stopping along the way to give poetry readings in village halls, churches, pubs and living rooms for bed and board. So, yet another walking challenge or project. Entertainingly, at one point he is in danger of bumping into Seamus Heaney, also undertaking a walking project at the same time. And. as I discovered when looking at his website, in 2013 he’s writing the follow-up – Walking away, a journey from Minehead in Somerset along the north coast of the South West Coast Path to Land’s End and beyond…which rather spoils it for me. There are sateliite events, two articles in the Guardian (1 & 2) and everything. It’s not quite Ed and Will’s Walk around Britain.

For a taste of Simon’s deadpan style listen to his #rambings episode, part of the Stuart Maconie season on city skylines. The lads take a ramble on Marsden Moor near Saddleworth, aka Posh Oldham.

Saddleworth is a bit schizophrenic, having been part of Yorkshire until 1974. The moors are the lungs of the north. Simon talks about how the logic of a walk keeps you going, you are in competition with it and have to win. It’s mentally hard work, a different sort of challenge from other stresses such as deadlines. Walking pace mimics a heartbeat, and also the iambic pentameter, say some…walking is a process not a product. The Pennines are the spine of England, with a drop on one side to the North Sea and on the other to the Irish Sea, with views on this walk of Jodrell Bank and Beetham Tower at the end of Deansgate, the fourth tallest residential building in Europe. Fab.

Refshaleøen: CPH’s industrial heritage

Yesterday we visited Refshaleøen, a wilderness area just over the water from the Little Mermaid. An artificial island dominated by an abandoned shipyard, the area is being shined up in the name of the experience economy. As part of Kulturhavn, a harbour festival and the latest of a seemingly endless parade of same in CPH over the summer, there were guided walks and free waterbuses on offer.

Kulturhavn as a whole was nicely done, with events over the weekend at six harbour/dock locations:

After collecting the route map we went for the self guided walk option. Or rather beagle guided – drifting with beagles is often on their terms, and on a hot day compromises have to be made so they don’t completely exhaust themselves. One of our beagles is a horror in the car but a deep thinker at heart, and after some initial pulling paces himself to take it all in. The other one seems to do his thinking in the car, where he is happy looking out of the back window, but once he gets out it’s all systems go until exhaustion hits, when he lies down and won’t budge.

We pretty much followed the designated Shipyard Route – see Værftsruten for details of the 15 locations – but will have to come back on a cooler day to take in the details. As a whole the ‘island’ has a bit of everything – views across the water to Copenhagen ‘proper’, industrial chic, a trendy beach bar (Halvandet), windmills/fishing, although access is an issue. Copehagen’s heritage as an industrial harbour city is an interesting one, rather different from the fairytale image.

Clare Balding’s Ramblings

Update: ultimate Ramblings: Geoff Nicholson, 20 Oct 2016

Ramblings is an R4 programme hosted by national treasure Clare Balding, broadcast since 1999.

It’s quintessential R4 and prone to well, rambling, as Clare gets into conversation with her fellow walkers. I’m not entirely sure how much specialised clothing is involved – probably varies.

I’ve hurled the programme into my feedreader and bookmarked the archive to see where it takes us – see the #ramblings tag. I’ve also stuck #R4Ramblings into Hootsuite, although also need to keep an eye on the rather more random #ramblings. Update, Dec 2013: I’ve now listened to the entire archive of 100+ podcasts. I’m still no wiser as to the definition of a #ramble, but it was fun!

Each series has a theme – a possible taxonomy? In the current series (24) Clare is walking in search of new places, new people and new experiences – how apt!

27 June: Tara Bariana recalls his long walk home to India. Last one of the series – back in the autumn.

Clare walks on Cannock Chase with Tara, who recalls his 19 month walk home to the Punjab in 1995.

20 June: West Highland Way from Balmaha

Clare walks a section of the West Highland Way with twin sister ultra runners.

13 June: In search of the old ways

A ‘linear walk’ with Robert Macfarlane in Cambridgeshire’s Himalayas. Walking became a leisure activity rather than a necessity in the late 1800s, however pedestrian was still a bit declasse compared to chivalry/horseback. Wayfaring and walking clubs became popular, with anthologies of poetry and prose, although there was also a darker side with the Old English Brigade in search of Englishness. Does UKIP walk?

Walking as a special way of seeing, connecting with the landscape both familiar and unknown/challenging. The Cambridgeshire landscape can be considered uncharismatic if typical of contemporary England, and it has taken a long time for Robert to learn to read it and love it – you need to learn to love your place.

The walk explores the old ways, a network of footpaths, long, beckoning lines forming gates and portals into the landscape, the stage for eg a couple with a black spaniel walking between their legs. Wide paths created before the 18th century parcelling up of the land by enclosures (qv, also Connemara) and hedgerows, creating a partitioned version of the landscape (something about DK?).

Creates the mapping of our lives – interior landscapes and landscapes we travelled through, personal landscapes, as individual as we are, in our mind as well as in front of us. We all have our heartlands.

6 June: George Monbiot in search of the wild

George has a new book out, Feral: searching for enchantment on the frontiers of rewilding – here’s the short version. Obviously endorsed by me, but rather earnest.

30 May: In search of love

Waterproof trousers alert! another group walk “like a map of a relationship”, rather too Home Counties for me, plus rather too much about leaders and being in charge; OTOH might have to research GPS machines; the walk in question was 8.5 miles.

23 May: Chilterns American Women’s Club hiking group

This was fun, being an expat myself; the particular type of international women here were almost exclusively Anglo Saxon professional wives; a jarring note where one mentioned British reserve as a barrier to friendship – just try DK!; note to self to look for DK expat walking groups to not join…